Jan 162012
 

From the November 1, 2011, performance of Rat Shed Radio, held at Homegrown Press. Other Rat Shed Radio paddles can be found here: Fayette floaters and fair Jessamine.

Western

By Western.

From its headwaters in the mountainous southeastern part of the state, the Kentucky River flows northwest toward its confluence with the Ohio. The river diverts from this northwesterly course but once, when it hits the high grounds of the Lexington peneplain and is forced to cut a southwest route around the area now known as Lexington. The crescent-shaped region carved by this riverine diversion, the fabled canelands, has long been a hub of all forms of life.

This section of Rat Shed pairs some history on the Fayette crescent with songs by Wes Houp, Chris Sullivan and Warren Byrom. Continue reading »

Jun 222011
 

Thursday, June 30

Warren Byrom
Al’s Bar; 601 N. Limestone. 7 P.M.

Byrom plays selections from his recent release, The Fabled Canelands. See the accompanying review.

JJ Grey & Mofro
Buster’s, 899 Manchester St. 8:39 P.M.

Out of the north Florida swamps rises Mr. Grey, his harp, and a motley squad of southern-rock virtuosi.

See what I was trying to do with that sentence? Continue reading »

Jun 222011
 

By Danny Mayer

“oh those fabled canelands
they come shimmering back
through two centuries”

—Warren Byrom, “Fabled Canelands”

There is a grand tradition within roots music to evoke what Greil Marcus has termed “the old, weird America,” a sort of mythical, strange underworld of the pre-modern American republic, a place where the boundaries separating blues, country, folk and mountain music do not yet seem to have taken hold. Musically, think Harry Smith’s folkways recordings of the 1920s, Woody Guthrie, Mississippi John Hurt, the Carter Family, John Hartford’s Aereoplane years, The Basement Tapes, Nebraska, and just about anything by Gillian Welch, Uncle Tupelo or Dexter Romweber. Continue reading »