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Out on the streets » North of Center
 

Out on the streets, that’s where we’ll meet

By Captain Comannokers

When we think of people and transportation, we think of infrastructure, and safety, and technology – and probably a number of other key factors before we land on an aspect that often is overlooked: the emotion of transportation.

And there is plenty of it, too, especially in the daily travels of an urban area. People are wound up balls of emotion, even if they don’t readily admit to it. We acknowledge the fact that we get emotional at large events in our lives – weddings, funerals, holidays, and (of course) national championships. But we aren’t ready to admit that “I drove to Kroger to pick up some milk, bread, Fritos, and two pounds of flavored Tootsie Rolls – and it was soooo emotional.” The fact is, a lot of the time it is.  Continue reading »

 

Out on the streets, that’s where we’ll meet

By Captain Comannokers

NoC Transportation Czar

One reason I love riding a bike so much is that it is such a multi-sensory experience.

You can feel the wind on your face. (This time of year you can do so until you can no longer feel your face.) I’ve definitely tasted a few bugs – none of which I can recommend.

Without the enclosure most vehicles have, you can smell your surroundings pretty swiftly, too. Each neighborhood has its own distinct aroma depending on types of trees, nearby factories or other odorous factors. Continue reading »

 

Out on the streets, that’s where we’ll meet

By Captain Comannokers
NoC Transportation Czar

With the grand re-opening of The Lyric Theater (hoorah!!) in Lexington’s East End, the city has made adjustments to traffic flow affecting both motorists and cyclists. Perhaps not a nightmare as the title of the column suggests, but there are several tricky spots that need your attention. (Additionally, titling it something akin to “Changes on Elm Tree” is really lame. I know what sells: sex, fear, blood, gore, sex, sugar, convenience, power and a smart pair of trousers.)

The issue: the new windfall of on-street parking on Elm Tree and how these spots have changed the traffic patterns. Continue reading »

 

Out on the streets, that’s where we’ll meet

By Captain Commanokers

NoC Transportation Czar

Once the dust settles from all of the current downtown construction, you may wonder what changes are in store. Perhaps there will be motorized moving sidewalks, or a museum on the CentrePointe block detailing the lifelong struggles of the Webb brothers?

I can’t confirm either of those projects at this moment, but at least one of the changes sounds epic and mystical – floating bike lanes. This is the future! Bikes will enter a special anti-gravity sector where they will levitate over downtown streets, ridding motorists of those pesky cyclists once and for all!

Well, not quite – everyone still needs to cheerfully share the road. In reality, there will be just a slight adjustment to how they share it on Vine Street from South Broadway to South Limestone. According to LFUCG Bikeway/Pedestrian Coordinator Kenzie Gleason, the changes will take place by the week of September 19.

The city has spelled it out in detail at www.floatingbikelane.com. The issue is this: When there is street parking during some parts of the day and not others, what do you do with the bike lane? The city believes that the floating bike lane is the logical answer. Continue reading »

 

Out on the streets, that’s where we’ll meet

By Captain Comannokers

NoC Transportation Czar

Despite the growing support for alternative transportation in Lexington, we are not suddenly going to find ourselves in a Norman Rockwellesque utopia where everyone waves, tips their caps, and rings their bicycle bells. It’s a nice idea, but the reality is that sharing the road can be a frustrating, tricky, and dangerous proposition.

The simple goal of this column is to create dialogue between everyone who shares the road. I invite you, as a pedestrian, cyclist, or motorist, to send in specific concerns related to the flow of traffic or laws of the road. If you’ve given a hand gesture or were forced to yell a curse word or two because of a traffic predicament, let me know—let’s see if we can clear the air on what went down. In turn, hopefully readers will learn something they didn’t know and take the corrective measure next time they’re out and about. Continue reading »