Apr 052013
 

Poems by Eric Scott Sutherland

Images by Brian Connors Manke

These poems and images appeared with Tony Stilt’s essay, “The Lexington Central Public Library is a home.” All poems will appear in Eric’s forthcoming Accents publication, pendulum.

 

not in the job description

Librarians are almost always very helpful

and often almost absurdly knowledgeable.

WelcomeWEBTheir skills are probably very underestimated

and largely underemployed.

-Charles Medawar

You went to school

to study library science,

to become an ambassador

for letters and literacy.

You love books

and want to help

people read.

You never expected

you’d be directing

people to the bathroom

and telling them

not to fall asleep.

 

have and have-not

In the dim rotunda

two people sit,

inanimate as mannequins.

New-Yorker-MagazineWEBOne is dressed in a slate

three piece uniform.

The other wears a rainbow

of second-hand mismatches.

They watch a pendulum

swing beneath the eye of the sky,

marking the miserable

seconds of the day,

the tick tocks of rat claws

as they race.

In one’s wide dark

pupils, the dream is unattainable.

And in the others the myth is

exposed, hope already lost.

 

fishing for change

lost skipper, Phoenix Park, far from sea

hair grayish green like rocky coast

Pendulum-upWEBmoss tangled under an old sock hat

a body of wire wrapped in a ragged coat

shredded to stuffing and thread

an unlit cigarette hangs between thin lips

a ship tossed in the storm of his beard

every morning voyage passes the pay phone

he casts his finger into the coin return slot

but I have never seen him get lucky

never seen him catch a dime

 

Milkshake Ricky

loves oatmeal cookies

and peanut butter shakes,

dresses in cutoff sweats

over full length

sweats, looks like he flew

out of the cuckoo’s nest,

Freedome-recordsWEBlost four pair of glasses

and two umbrellas

last week.

 

Milkshake Ricky is losing

more than his mind. The way

he fumbles through

layers of worn cotton

searching for his billfold

he may have also

lost what little

money there is left

from his monthly check.

Apr 272011
 

When workers run their own factories, banks and schools: A report on the Mondragan Coops

For the past 50 years, an organized network of over 120 factories and more than 100,000 workers has been growing in Spain’s Basque Country. It has allowed workers to develop their own bank, schools and research centers. Called the Mondragon Coops, they are unique in that they are owned and controlled by the workers themselves—one worker, one share, one vote. They are also unique in they obtain credit from their own worker-owned bank and skills from their own university. They are thriving and growing and have a lot to teach us on the possibilities of radical change in hard times.

Head on out to the downtown library at 7:00 P.M. onTuesday, May 10 for a free talk on Mondragan and other worker-cooperatives by Carl Davidson, a national co-chair of the Committees of Correspondence for Democracy and Socialism, member of Steelworker Associetes, and writer for Beaver County Blue. Davidson currently resides in Aliquippa, his hometown in Western, PA.

Next PFLAG meeting Wednesday May 4

Drop on by Joespeh Beth’s on Wednesday, May 4 for the next meeting of PFLAG (Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays). Meeting is from 6:30-8:30 in Jo-Beth’s Gallery. There will be a screening of “You should meet my,” a comedy about a conservative Southern mom who is horrified to discover her only son is gay. Determined that he won’t go through life alone, she sets out to find him the perfect husband.

On Saturday May 14 at Shilito Park Shelter #2, PFLAG will host a cookout from 11:30 A.M.-2:30 P.M. Bring your disc golf and bocce. 

Feb 162011
 

Screenings at Kentucky Theatre and Lexington Public Library focus on cultural issues

By Grayson Johnson

Now in its thirteenth year, Lexington’s own One World Film Festival is currently underway, showcasing recent movies that bring to light poignant cultural themes and ideas.  “We’re not trying to hit you over the head with it,” laughs festival organizer Annette Mayer. “But, in a subtle way, in a pleasant way, to expand your knowledge.”  The festival brings in both narrative and documentary films that highlight pressing social issues both in America and abroad.  “Through film,” Mayer notes, “maybe we can understand cultural diversity.” Continue reading »

Dec 082010
 

KET’s Community Cinema at The Lexington Public Library

KET will host its monthly screening of the Community Cinema Series on Thursday, December 16 at 6 pm. This month’s film is “The Calling,” a behind-the-scenes look at young  people of different faiths who are preparing to become America’s next generation of religious leaders. As always, the film will be shown at the downtown branch of the Lexington Public Library and is free of charge. Plan to stick around for a discussion to follow. For more information, please visit: http://www.ket.org/communitycinema/

Lexington Film League Seeking Submissions for 2nd Do-ers Contest

The Lexington Film League continues to accept submissions for the 2nd year of the “Do-ers Video Contest.”  If you are a filmmaker who would like to profile a community “Do-er”, or if you are an organization who would like to be featured, please visit http://www.lexingtonfilmleague.org for more details. The contest is open to all Kentuckians and will culminate in a final event at Natasha’s Bistro and Bar where the top videos will be shown and cash prizes will be awarded. The submissions deadline is February 1, 2011.

Oct 272010
 

The beginning of a story in three places

By Danny Mayer

I noticed it a week before the WEGers arrived. The table was gone and here I was with the new “Boycott Coke During the WEG” issue, hot, weighted down with the remains of my 250 paper Downtown Drop-off 1 overburden, already running late for work and, later, for walking my equally heavy Campus Drop-off 2 route.

The table is at the Public Library’s Main Branch, located next to Phoenix Park, across Limestone along CentrePointe’s eastern block. This, too, was once a pasture birthed of sports-tourism inflected demolition, this one drawing off the other, non-equine, sporting fanaticism: college basketball, the 85 Final Four, Villanova over Georgetown in one of the all-time great upsets in college basketball history. Continue reading »

Oct 272010
 

The conclusion of a story in three places

By Danny Mayer

On October 14, UK’s student newspaper, the Kentucky Kernel, reported that staff members in the paper’s advertising division had been caught distributing free copies of the paper to guests tailgating at Commonwealth Stadium before the September 18 Cats’ home football game against regional powerhouse Akron University. Originally busted by UK athletics officials for driving “an improperly marked golf cart,” the officers later came back and ordered the staff to cease and desist their unlawful activities: the giving away of free papers to UK sports fans, many of whom were, presumably, alumni, students or kin to alumni or students. Continue reading »

Jun 092010
 

Part of showcase of documentary films by H. Clay alum

By Danny Mayer

On June 12 and 13 (Saturday and Sunday), the downtown public library will hold a free viewing of six documentaries made by filmmaker Lucy Massie Phenix. A graduate of Henry Clay high school, Phenix will be in town for her 50 year high school reunion.

As an editor, director and producer, Phenix’s body of work is a wonderful example of how the medium of documentary film can be used to engage emotionally with politically and socially charged events. Her first work on documentary films, for the acclaimed 1971 Vietnam War documentary Winter Soldier, chronicled a war crimes panel held in Michigan at the height of the Vietnam War. Conducted by the Vietnam Veterans Against the War, the panel featured hundreds of soldiers documenting their own experiences and observations of U.S. war crimes in Vietnam. Though the panel was little covered by the press in the papers (though widely attended by journalists), the details of American war crimes have come to be an important document of recent American history—in large part through the continued popularity of the Winter Soldier documentary. Continue reading »