May 072013
 

The Kentucky Room

I was really surprised in your article about the library (“The Lexington Central Public Library is a home,” April 2013) that nowhere did it mention the existence of the Kentucky Room. Now, I know that was not the focus of your article, but given the fact that I am very interested in the history of Lexington, and probably know as much in that area as most, I was looking for that part.

The Kentucky Room has maps of Lexington which have helped me in my treasure hunting activities here since 1999 when I moved here with my family (since divorced). It also has books, reference materials, etc., for those who are interested.

Quite a few people don’t know of its existence–what a shame. The real Lexington is buried there, why don’t you check it our?

By the way, I just got a copy of your paper from my daughter: I score it 8 out of 10.

Sincerely,
Jack Ross
Eagle Scout
Homeless advocate
Business owner without income
Teamster son
Creator

Apr 052013
 

By Tony Stilt

The print version of this piece included poems by Eric Scott Sutherland and more photos by Brian Connors Manke. Follow the link to see the Sutherland poems and more Connors Manke images.

“The heavy anchor of the Foucault Pendulum hovers lazily over a blue and gold map of the United States.” Photo by Brian Connors Manke.

“The heavy anchor of the Foucault Pendulum hovers lazily over a blue and gold map of the United States.” Photo by Brian Connors Manke.

Everyone who knows the Lexington Central Public library knows that the fifth floor doesn’t matter—it is comprised of administrative offices, board rooms, et cetera. But the other four floors have a life of their own…

Floor One

The heavy anchor of the Foucault Pendulum hovers lazily over a blue and gold map of the United States, its golden pointer aiming one moment at Ohio, the next at an area I assume to be Missouri, but it doesn’t matter. It is swaying and it is the centerpiece and it is ignored, largely. Across from it a congregation is forming: people in ragged-looking coats and winter hats stand before a set of metal doors, watching them. Ding. The noise echoes through the building, its high pitch ringing into the creases of the New Releases; it rustles the protruding slips of names hanging from items on the “Requests” shelves; its persistence breezes lightly its neighbor, the pendulum, towards Georgia. Continue reading »

Mar 172013
 
Mayer's Town Branch Commons Design Challenge. Photo by Danny Mayer.

Mayer’s Town Branch Commons Design Challenge. Photo by Danny Mayer.

NoC editor Danny Mayer is sponsoring a Town Branch Commons design challenge. He’s calling on area commoners to come up with an affordable and functional design to redevelop a portion of  151 East Vine Street, a .62 acre publicly owned surface parking lot that runs downtown between Vine and Water Street in Lexington, Kentucky. He will present the winning idea to a meeting of the city council, at which time he will formally request public funding for the project.

The idea for Mayer’s challenge began after the NoC editor read about a city leader’s recent admission that closing down surface parking lots on Vine Street is “clearly implementable” and “within the realm of do-ability.”

“I think it’s great,” Mayer said, “that city leaders are finally acknowledging the benefits of transforming under-used government property into human-scaled places of interaction and mobility. I want to do my part to encourage more of that thinking.” Continue reading »