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Captain Comannokers » North of Center
 

By Captain Comannokers
NoC Transportation Czar

Which way am I going?
That’s for me to know
and you to find out

It’s more exciting this way
…for both of us Continue reading »

 

Out on the streets, that’s where we’ll meet

By Captain Comannokers

When we think of people and transportation, we think of infrastructure, and safety, and technology – and probably a number of other key factors before we land on an aspect that often is overlooked: the emotion of transportation.

And there is plenty of it, too, especially in the daily travels of an urban area. People are wound up balls of emotion, even if they don’t readily admit to it. We acknowledge the fact that we get emotional at large events in our lives – weddings, funerals, holidays, and (of course) national championships. But we aren’t ready to admit that “I drove to Kroger to pick up some milk, bread, Fritos, and two pounds of flavored Tootsie Rolls – and it was soooo emotional.” The fact is, a lot of the time it is.  Continue reading »

 

Out on the streets, that’s where we’ll meet


By Captain Comannokers
NoC Transportation Czar

There are a shit ton of people out there who are not very good drivers. I am SO in favor of making it tougher to get a license. You should need a 90 percent or higher on your written test. If you don’t know the laws and how they apply to the road, should you be out on it?

Add our modern-world distractions that folks love to tinker with while behind the wheel, and the recipe is like adding sour milk to a rotten egg omelet. Continue reading »

 

Out on the streets, that’s where we’ll meet

By Captain Comannokers
NoC Transportation Czar

A television commercial that recently caught some attention featured a wave of night cyclists cruising the streets in a futuristic, neon dream. The commercial had more people talking about the super-cool, glowing rides than the actual product it was trying to promote (cell phones), but that’s the way the marketing world works sometimes—as long as you’ve got ‘em talking, you are still in the game. You’ll actually have to check with college marketing classes or Mad Men to confirm that last statement, but it seems like something they’d teach you, or a line those witty writers would use. Continue reading »

 

By Captain Comannokers

The genius and appeal of Boomslang at its core is that it can be what you want it to be. The tagline for the three-year old festival is “a celebration of sound and art,” but it should be called “a celebration of whatever YOU want to celebrate.” It really is that simple.

The proof is in what has happened already in the first two years and what the third year schedule has in store. Continue reading »

 

Out on the streets, that’s where we meet

By Captain Comannokers
NoC Transportation Czar

Welcome back students! Now sit down, pay attention, and nobody will get hurt (hopefully).

With the autumnal re-population swell in Lexington, the bike traffic in and around campus/downtown becomes much heavier. That is a wonderful thing – the more people use bikes to get around Lexington the more the demand for infrastructure will need to be met. BUT, it also means that cyclists need to get on the same page, which is often a tough proposition in a college town where many people ride their bikes with little regard for safety, let alone common sense. Things have actually gotten better over the last few years, so that’s a positive sign, but let’s not get too excited – on any given day, I still see someone riding the wrong way, head-on, into traffic, talking on a cell phone, and flipping off a driver because, well, I’m not sure exactly why, to be honest.

There have been some recent and significant changes right around campus that everyone should make note of. Maxwell has finally received a good chunk of bike lane – starting at S. Limestone and heading east toward Woodland Park. Street parking has shifted to the north side of the street. Continue reading »

 

By Captain Comannokers
NoC Transportation Czar

In their infinite songwriting wisdom, the band Toto told us in 1978 to “Hold The Line.” It’s a song about the tricky game of timing in relationships – well, at last that’s what I think it’s about, I mean, this band was splitting time between singing songs about Rosanna Arquette, George Lucas’ THX1138 and blessing the rains down in Africa with lines like “As sure as Kilimanjaro rises like Olympus above the Serengeti,” so really, all bets are off for me de-coding Toto lyrics.

Anyway, I’m co-opting “Hold The Line” as a cycling mantra for getting around the streets of Lexington. Continue reading »

 

J.T. Dockery and Nick Tosches team up for dizzying graphic novel

By Captain Comannokers

When pen hits paper, J.T. Dockery isn’t using any technologies that were developed since before the Great Depression when it comes to producing his illustrative art. “I’m analog forever,” Dockery states, confirming his old-school sensibilities. Steel tube technical pens like the rapidograph, which Dockery uses, hit the market in 1928. He must special order bristol board (illustration paper tough and absorbent enough to handle his intense pen and ink cross hatching), developed in 1893.  Even the nibs dipped into the ink were the invention of Joseph Gillott in 1859. Continue reading »

 

Out on the streets, that’s where we’ll meet

By Captain Comannokers

NoC Transportation Czar

One reason I love riding a bike so much is that it is such a multi-sensory experience.

You can feel the wind on your face. (This time of year you can do so until you can no longer feel your face.) I’ve definitely tasted a few bugs – none of which I can recommend.

Without the enclosure most vehicles have, you can smell your surroundings pretty swiftly, too. Each neighborhood has its own distinct aroma depending on types of trees, nearby factories or other odorous factors. Continue reading »

 

Out on the streets, that’s where we’ll meet

By Captain Comannokers
NoC Transportation Czar

With the grand re-opening of The Lyric Theater (hoorah!!) in Lexington’s East End, the city has made adjustments to traffic flow affecting both motorists and cyclists. Perhaps not a nightmare as the title of the column suggests, but there are several tricky spots that need your attention. (Additionally, titling it something akin to “Changes on Elm Tree” is really lame. I know what sells: sex, fear, blood, gore, sex, sugar, convenience, power and a smart pair of trousers.)

The issue: the new windfall of on-street parking on Elm Tree and how these spots have changed the traffic patterns. Continue reading »