By Danny Mayer

“Organized greed always defeats disorganized democracy.”

—Matt Taibbi

Meeting 1

On Monday October 25, Bill Shelton, whom the Lexington Herald-Leader described as a “former Michigan educator who is now at the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges,” informed the University of Kentucky Board of Regents that they should be prepared to pay more for their next president. Less than two months earlier, as a retirement gift to outgoing UK CEO/President Lee Todd, the board had increased his presidential salary at the university nearly $200,000, to an annual salary of $511,000. The regents even backdated payments one year. Continue reading »

 

By Betsy Taylor

America’s founding documents speak in the first person plural with such power—“We the People…We hold these truths…We have warned them…We have reminded them…We have conjured them…We, therefore…solemnly publish and declare.” Why has it now become so hard to say “We” as Americans together?

This question has hounded me recently. On August 5, Dan Terry, a dear childhood friend was gunned down in the beautiful mountains of Afghanistan, along with nine others, on a Christian medical mission. Meanwhile, a month later the ninth anniversary of 9/11 brought our festering incapacities into the open, as national opposition to an Islamic Community Center in Manhattan has been justified primarily through a kind of ventriloquy that claims to speak for families who lost loved ones on 9/11. Continue reading »

Nov 242010
 

An NoC equine-sporting report

“I was writing this commentary about the World Equestrian Games, and after several false starts, I realized why it was difficult to put into words the single most important benefit of the event. It’s because we gained something that you can’t quantify in an economic impact study: confidence.”

—Business Lexington

Since landing the World Equestrian Games earlier in the decade, our city leaders have taken part in a pretty creative feedback loop. They have spent considerable amounts of their time, money and media space convincing the Lexington population that the far greater amounts they would spend of their time, money and media space on WEG would yield great returns for the city. Continue reading »

Nov 242010
 

Why roller derby is far more sport than football

By Troy Lyle

Most anyone who knows me would say I’m a sports nut, a junkie for all things requiring skill or physical prowess. A real freak for competition.

That is until recently. For more than a month now I’ve been reexamining my relationship with sports. It’s no coincidence that my once beloved Washington Redskins stink. Exhibit A–the six TD shellacking laid out in week 10 by Michael Vick and the Philadelphia Eagles. Continue reading »

 

November 28 Institute 193 show is free for all

By Captain Commanokers

“The one thing that is clear is that it is not clear.”

—Trevor Tremaine

August 10, 1980

Continue reading »

 

Lively up yourself

Saturday, November 27

Devin the Dude with Natti (of Cunninlynguists) and Nemo

Buster’s, 9 P.M.

It has been suggested that Devin’s beats and rhymes, but especially his beats, are so chill that you must be stoned to truly enjoy them. This is probably true, because Devin was almost certainly stoned when he cut whichever of his records you’re trying to enjoy. In fact, I’ll lay even odds that Devin will be stoned at his show at Buster’s this Saturday, during which he will rap lyrics that mostly involve being stoned.

Here are the conflicted comments of two anonymous posters on a well-known music message board, when confronted with Devin’s last release, Suite 420 (released this past April 20): Continue reading »

 

Devine Carama helps open the Lyric

By Patrice Morgan

The reopening of the historic Lyric Theatre has created a major buzz throughout the city, especially in the African American community. The Lyric, whose stage once hosted artists such as Red Foxx, Sarah Vaughan, and Ella Fitzgerald, is now back in business hosting hip hop artists such as Devine Carama, bringing artistic diversity to this historical landmark. Continue reading »

 

Indie network provides support for local filmmakers

By James Smith

Sure, Kentucky has had a few movies made here from big budget companies like Sony and Paramount (SeabiscuitDreamerElizabethtown and Secretariat to name a few) but there is actually a whole other world that exists beyond that. That world is the independent film circuit. Continue reading »

 

“White Christmas” at the Kentucky Theatre

The Bluegrass Rape Crisis Center will host a special presentation of the Irving Berlin classic on Thursday, December 2. A reception will be held at 6:30 P.M. and the film will start at 7. Tickets are $10 and will benefit the BRCC. For more information on tickets sales please visit: http://www.bluegrassrapecrisis.org/happenings/happenings.html.

“A Story of Floating Weeds” at the Downtown Arts Center

On Saturday, December 4 LexArts will present a treat for film and music lovers alike. Grammy-nominated guitarist Alex de Grassi will perform an original live score alongside a screening of Yasujiro Ozu’s classic silent film “A Story of Floating Weeds.” The event begins at 7 P.M. and tickets are $20 for adults and $15 for students with id. For more information on reserving your ticket, please visit: http://lexarts.tix.com.

Reel Visions Seeking Submissions

Want to see your short film broadcast on television? KET is seeking submissions for the 2011 season of “Reel Visions,” a 30 minute program that showcases Kentucky filmmakers. Each season, “Reel Visions” airs a collection of experimental, documentary, and narrative films which range in length from one to twenty-five minutes. All entries must be received by January 1, 2011. For information on how to submit your film, please visit: http://www.ket.org/arts/reelvisions/.


 

By Mary Ashley Burton

It would be difficult to argue that women receive equal representation to men within the film industry. According to the Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film, women comprised only 16% of all directors, executive producers, producers, writers, cinematographers, and editors working in the top 250 domestic grossing films of 2009. This marked a 3% decline from 2001. Women accounted for only 7% of film directors in 2009, which was a 2% decline from 2008. Continue reading »