“Emergency” shelters set up

By Jeff Gross

Last Friday, central Kentucky began playing host to “the world,” as we’ve been repeatedly told. “Company’s coming” has been the refrain and late last week Mayor Newberry sent an email telling residents to “sweep the front porch” for our guests: “When we have company at our house, one of the last things we do is sweep off the front porch so our guests have a good first impression.  Now is time for each of us to think of the few last minute things we can do to make sure Lexington’s guests have a good first impression.”

Evidently, one of the “last minute things” has been consideration for the homeless in downtown.

Until October 10, downtown streets will be closed in the evening, filling with festival-goers for live music and medal ceremonies. Normal patterns of downtown life will be suspended, especially for those who live on the streets and in Phoenix Park. Continue reading »

 

By Kenn Minter

http://notfromherecomic.blogspot.com/

 

Thursday, September 30

The Muggs

Green Lantern, 10:00. 21+

Detroit. Rock city. A little more than a decade ago I was smitten, as it happens, with a young woman way out my league. This was in Portland, Oregon, and the young woman in question was fresh in from DTW. Don’t remember why she’d come, but she’d moved with several friends who all knew the saxophonist in a local jazz-funk outfit that I road-managed for a time, who’d also moved to Portland some years prior, after taking a music degree from Wayne State.

She was beautiful, so much so that when she told me one night over drinks that basketball player Grant Hill, then with the Pistons, had once made an unsuccessful play for her affections, I absolutely believed her. She was a bit tipsy at the time, and this was her beautiful-woman way of rejecting my own advances: I’ve turned down millionaire NBA stars, honey; don’t embarrass yourself further. I took the hint. Continue reading »

 

A progressive city council candidate in a hopelessly conservative city

By Danny Mayer

Say what you will about Don Pratt, but it’s difficult to deny that, for the past 50 years, the current at-large city council candidate has been one of Lexington’s most engaged local citizens on issues big and small, national and local.

So why is it that he’s been snubbed for political office so often, for so long, by a city that proclaims its desire to have an active citizenry, one that’s trying to re-brand itself as a progressive city? Continue reading »

 

On the Lexington set of Hitting the Cycle

By Jennifer Miller

It’s somehow symbolic of Hollywood that Tara was just a facade with no rooms inside.”David O. Selznick

It’s 3 AM, and I sit at the computer, trying to describe just how hospitable filmmaker Richey Nash found local friends and strangers to be during the production process for Hitting the Cycle (www.HTCmovie.com). Then my friend Lucy calls from a show at Buster’s and asks whether she can bring a touring punk rock band to sleep at my house, since hotels are fully booked for the World Equestrian Games. Of course, I say. And then I have my metaphor.

The punk quartet can now tell other bands that Lexington is a place with quality professional venues, talented artists, and caring local people. And the HTC cast and crew can take the same message back with them to Los Angeles. Continue reading »

 

Storm sewer education through art

By Beth Connors-Manke

I heard it when I went back to listen to the tapes. Over the course of several weeks, I had talked to Blake Eames and Claudia Michler, always on the street in the heat and grit, always over wet paint. Sometimes they had on fluorescent orange construction vests, with the tan that comes with street work where the sun hits the pavement and comes right back up. Their hair in pigtail braids.

On the tapes were two things: their joy in making art being welcomed by many and the incessant rumbling of cars. As I listened to our conversations, I decided this was the good and bad of it. Art was pleasing them and passersby—this was the good—but the art was a symptom of a variety of failures in our city.

Storm Drain at High and Rose. Photo by Brian Connors-Manke.

Continue reading »

 

Terrible showing by Redskins provokes NoC icon

NoC News

Due to an incomprehensible, unfathomable and outright unspeakable rift in the sporting cosmos, the Frugal Fisherman has reportedly gone missing. He was last seen stumbling out of Winchell’s on Southland around 7 PM this past Sunday, moments after the Washington Redskins laid an egg against the lowly Saint Louis Rams. Eyewitness accounts report he was extremely inebriated, displaying fits of anger and screaming wildly, Who lets Rams ass fuck them?…The Skins are toasted dog shit!…Fuck football! Fuck America!!” Continue reading »

 

But a lost evening at Winchell’s

By Northrupp Center

The stoner walk comes early at River Hill, a dense patch of second-growth honeysuckle that huddles up to Man O War on the approach to hole two. After an opening bogey on hole one and an errant first throw, a high-sailer that was knocked down 100 feet into its flight toward basket number two, I was relieved to find a reprieve. And so I sat, passing a small hollowed out piece of wood back and forth for a few moments with a good friend, letting a couple other groups pass us by, and enjoying the clearing, finally cool skies. Continue reading »

 

By Joe Anthony

“What,” asks Shakespeare’s Falstaff, “is honor?” There is no practicality to it. It “hath no skill in surgery,” he discovers. It is a mere word. Air. “Honor is a mere scutcheon,” he concludes, prompted mainly, it’s true, by his cowardice. Honor breaks bones though it does not set them. He will have none of it.

Falstaff’s quest for a definition of honor comes to mind because I, too, have been wondering lately about this word “honor.” It’s in the news so much lately. What is its substance? In particular, what do the tea-partiers and Glenn Beck have in mind when they say things like , “Let’s bring back honor and let’s take back the country”? Continue reading »

 

By Troy Lyle

Area Disc Golf Tournaments

The Bluegrass Disc Golf Association (BDGA) is still accepting new members. This fall BDGA will participate in a number of regional tournaments, and it’s not too late to join them. The group is still taking applications for all of its upcoming tournaments. If you’d like to enter a tournament, become a BDGA member or learn more about disc golf in general visit www.bdga.org.

Here’s a list of upcoming tournaments: Continue reading »