Mar 062013
 

A Creatives for Common Sense position paper

Illustration by Christopher Epling.

Illustration by Christopher Epling.

Writing in the February 22 Lexington Herald Leader, columnist Tom Eblen called attention to the clunky Lexington Fayette Urban County Government (LFUCG) moniker employed since the 1970s merger of the city and county. “[D]epending on how you say it,” Tom observes of the abbreviated term, it “sounds either like alphabet soup or an obscenity…How did the government of such a beautiful place end up with such a bureaucratic name?” (What about L-Fudge, Tom? This seems a plausible rendering of the LFUCG term, one that is relatively un-bureaucratic and wonderfully tasty. But we digress…)

In the article and in another follow-up piece, Tom suggests that LFUCG  dump the the FUCG  part (the Fudge, or perhaps the FUCK-G or the Fuckage, depending on pronunciation). In its place, Tom suggests a focus on the “L”: we should refer to our home  simply as “Lexington,” or following former mayor Foster Pettit’s suggestion, the “Community of Lexington.”

As it so happens, the Creatives for Common Sense (CfCS) have been studying this very issue. Over the past two years, the group has been identifying the potential brand opportunities and pitfalls of the term “Lexington” while also seeking out new local-first brand identities. Based on our own studies, we agree with Lexington Forum president Winn Stephens, cited in Tom’s follow-up article, that “[n]obody with any marketing or public relations savvy would come up with a moniker like LFUCG.” Continue reading »

Feb 022013
 

The leek: a satirical take

Illustration by Christopher Epling.

Illustration by Christopher Epling.

By Horace Heller Hedley, IV

In a bold initiative for solving stubborn Federal budget problems, the U.S. House of Representatives will, for the first time in its history, accept official corporate sponsorship. As anticipated, the move has created a scramble among America’s largest corporations which are now vying for exclusive rights to sponsor the House—an undreamed of branding and public relations coup for the winner.

The news sent shock waves through the Fortune 500, as at least a dozen of America’s top corporations jockeyed for position in the upcoming public auction, dubbed “the mother of all bidding wars.”  Continue reading »

Dec 052012
 
Veteran homeless
In reflecting on hurricane Sandy, I started wondering about all the homeless that live in the old tunnels in New York City. Did NYC get them evacuated? How many of our homeless brethren did we loose to this storm? Will their deaths be counted?
So far, not counting homeless deaths due to Sandy, we’ve lost 36, 897 (Nava, November 2012). Since 6% of the homeless population are veterans who served our country with honor to protect our freedom, how are their deaths treated?
It would be wonderful to find housing for all of them. Obama fought for and got HUD funding for veterans, but he knows this isn’t enough to solve the problem that exist amongst our veterans. However, due to severe mental illness which they’ve developed while in service to this country Our Afghan War and early Iraq War veterans have even more risk of developing severe mental health disorders, which prevents them from reaching out to get help, assistance, and being able to maintain housing.
When you consider this number, 36,897 souls lost while homeless and 6% being veterans, this means close to 3,000 veterans have died while being homeless. So how do our cities/towns treat these honorable veterans’ deaths?
If their families can be located and want to take responsibility for the burial, do the families know they’re entitled to a military funeral? If the family can’t be found or don’t want to or can’t afford burial, do our cities/towns work with their local V.A. to see that these men and women who served their country get the military burial with honor that they so richly deserve? Would V.A. regulations even allow this?
If we can’t reach them before their death, we can at least restore dignity to them in their death by giving them the honor they earned when we bury them.
Robin Osgood, Rose Street, Lexington, KY
Walking while female
I hear you (“Shaming women,” November 2012). I too am female and live and used to work on the North end. During my tenure as a drafter for Windstream, currently housed in the building that used to be K-Mart on new Circle, I frequently used Lime, N. Broadway, etc., for my lunch time running grounds.
One day, I was walking back to work down N. Lime after an exhausting run for a pregnant lady. I don’t know if it was my running attire or generally disheveled appearance that signaled to some strange older guy in a minivan that I might be “working” the North Limestone area, but he shouted out the window asking if I wanted a ride. I waved him off, “no thanks, I can run” and kept on walking with a quickened pace. Really, I couldn’t run anymore…for some reason I was spent. Evidently, my decline didn’t convince him because he turned around, slowed up, stopped and waited as I walked on by. I didn’t have mace or a gun, but I had a phone, so I took it out and dialed one of my co-workers to let her know my distressing situation and where I could be located. The man decided I wasn’t worth the hassle, I guess, and drove off. Golden caravan, maybe 2000 model? This was at least 4 years ago, but I won’t forget it.
This wasn’t the first time I’ve felt threatened in a similar way by a man driving down a street, I on my feet. I used to live in Louisville and walking around at night in the highlands isn’t free of these kind of encounters.
Shannon, web post
Looking for topless mountains
Hello, I am on the search for the Topless Mountains are Obscene bumper sticker (“Outside the governor’s office,” June 2012). I am looking for the one that has the topless mountains that resemble a female’s breast. I can make donation or buy it. Any info would be appreciated.
Michael Cash, online
Author responds,
I got the rectangular shaped sticker from a woman from Louisville who was from the Unitarian Church or progressive Catholic Church. She was with a group lobbying in Frankfort last spring. You might ask Dave Cooper who is an organizer/spokesman with the Bluegrass Sierra Club and his own Mountaintop Removal Roadshow. Feel free to ask for more help if this is not enough. don pratt.
Dec 052012
 

Dear editor,

I would like to invite readers to take the Project Appleseed pledge of school and community involvement. I am a student at the University of Kentucky and sort of fell into a public advocacy class. Lucky for me, the class provided a friendly push toward advocating for the betterment of our schools. After working in an after school program for two years and taking a few child development classes, I decided that I was very much in support of school reform. When an assignment arose for finding a live advocacy campaign, it was obvious that I’d focus on schools. Continue reading »

Nov 072012
 

The leek: a satirical take

By Horace Heller Hedley, IV

In a bold move to open more payment options for financially strapped customers, Anthem Blue Cross will allow subscribers to pay premiums by offering their vital organs to the insurance giant. The new program, dubbed “Kidneys for Koverage,” provides a variety of flexible options, allowing both healthy and ailing customers to derive monetary value from their functioning organ systems.

“We asked ourselves, ‘Those subscribers who can’t afford monthly premiums — where are their untapped assets?’” said Ronald Hilfinger, Director of Customer Relations. “Their houses are mostly sold already—especially our customers in poor health. But with a healthy kidney going for $150,000, the average person’s most valuable asset is their excess organ capacity.   Since we already had access to an extensive network of surgeons, it was a natural fit.” Continue reading »

Nov 072012
 

By Marcus Flores

Because everything an incumbent president does is, to his challenger, wrong, Obama’s résumé in the Middle East has become a sort of fetish during the debate season. Yet the responsible voter—who can momentarily set aside their Obama or Romney pennant—notes that both candidates are virtually indistinguishable on Iran, and that is a pity. Continue reading »

Oct 302012
 

The leek: a satirical take

By Horace Heller Hedley, IV

Seamus Romney, namesake of the Republican presidential candidate’s infamous family dog, attempted to cast a ballot in Iowa’s early voting. Republicans are citing the incident as evidence that tougher voter ID laws are urgently needed.

The fraudulent voting was attempted in the County Auditor’s office in Guthrie County, Iowa, where early voting began on September 27. Election Officer Sheila Johansen gets credit for detecting the foul play. “First off, I’ve lived here all my life, and I’d never seen the guy before.   When he gave his name, I thought, wait a minute…isn’t that the name of the dog that Mitt supposedly strapped to his luggage rack and drove to Canada? I must have given the guy quite a look, because he bolted out the door before I could call the police. I told my friend about it, and she said, ‘Well, maybe he just really had to go out.’” Continue reading »

Oct 032012
 

By Marcus Flores

Theoretically, extreme partisanship presupposes a thorough understanding of one’s own party. In reality, it is often an indicator of the opposite—particularly for celebrities who generally forget that fame does not beget wisdom.

Hank Williams Jr. is loose again, scattering falsehoods like a Texas tornado. He has mislabeled President Barack Obama a Muslim who does not celebrate the pastoral values of rural Americans—fishing, hunting, and cowboys. (How conveniently he forgets that Romney—an Ivy League businessman with a blemished NRA record—is not exactly the figure one would expect to see plowing a field.) But Williams did not stop there, and in fact went on to defame liberals and “queer guitar pickers.” His peroration was as grand as it was pathetic: “Obama loves gays and we hate him.” Continue reading »

Oct 032012
 

Thoughts on language and action

By Patrick O’Dowd

There are two ways someone could look at Occupy Lexington’s one year anniversary rally in Phoenix Park: 1) As a grim picture of what remains of the national movement three hundred and sixty five days later; or 2) as a fair representation, for good or ill, of what the Occupy movement was from the beginning.

A pedestrian passing Lexington’s one year occupation rally might have to be forgiven for taking the former view of the movement. With a hand painted banner, a table of supplies and speaking equipment, it was not that the rally looked underprepared. It was that those remaining to remember the anniversary seemed merely to be talking to themselves, no longer meaningfully engaged — if they ever were — with the broader political moment. A harsh criticism for a local rally? Perhaps, but one that seems to reflect honestly the movement’s current condition, here in Lexington as elsewhere. Continue reading »