Sep 132013
 

Luke Lajoie Connors Manke steps to the plate

A family portrait. Dad, Luke Lajoie, Mom.

A family portrait. Dad, Luke Lajoie, Mom.

NoC News

Saturday, August 31

UK Hospital

He came in like a dream. A little small-ball, some hit and run for eight hours until mom said enough, and then a mad push to the plate amid the screams and cheers of players and spectators alike—as fine a debut performance as any in recent memory.

Luke Lajoie Connors Manke, a 6 pound, 15 ounce, rookie out of Fayette County measuring 21 inches tall, registered his first official plate appearance Saturday morning at 8:01 am.

Within hours of hearing about his arrival, young fans began to gather out in the hallway reserved for under-fourteen-year olds, there to cheer on their newest hometown favorite. Continue reading »

Sep 132013
 

In late August, WLEX reporter Dave Wessex delivered a four-minute report on the North Limestone area that stirred a wide-ranging discussion on the North Limestone Neighborhood Association Facebook page. Below is a slightly revised version of NoC editor Danny Mayer’s contribution to that talk.

….

I. As a newer white resident with a college degree and job who bought a nice though somewhat shabby house four blocks north of Main Street on Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, I am a gentrifier no matter what I do or say. My actions in the neighborhood must always take that identity into account. Continue reading »

Sep 122013
 

By David Swanson

Some smart people thought, and perhaps some still think, that the 2003-2011 war on Iraq was unique in that it was promoted with the use of blatant lies. When I’d researched dozens of other wars and failed to find one that wasn’t based on a foundation of similar lies, I wrote a book about the most common war lie varieties. I called it War Is A Lie.

That book has sold more than any of my others, and I like to think it’s contributed some teeny bit to the remarkable and very welcome skepticism that is greeting the U.S. government’s current claims about Syria. The fact is that, were the White House telling the truth about the need for an attack on Syria, it would be a first in history. Every other case for war has always been dishonest. Continue reading »

Sep 122013
 

Public reveal of “MLKV” plans  set for Tuesday, September 17

NoC News

Mayer's Town Branch Commons Design Challenge. Photo by Danny Mayer.

Mayer’s Town Branch Commons Design Challenge. Photo by Danny Mayer.

This past April, NoC editor Danny Mayer issued an urban design challenge for Fayette Urban Countiers. The Mayer’s Challenge sought ideas and plans for affordably redeveloping a small part of city-owned urban space across Vine Street from the LexTran station. The design challenge was inspired by the city’s recent interest in redeveloping under-used parts of the urban fabric–particularly those urban surface parking lots that Rupp Opportunity Zone Master Planner Gary Bates once described as unsightly and unnecessary.

After months of collating ideas, on Tuesday, September 17, Mayer will present at two different public gatherings his findings for “MLKV”–his name for  the area under the MLK Viaduct. The first will be a brief presentation to City Council at their weekly 3:00 Tuesday Work Session. After that, a second public unveiling and presentation (you are all invited) will take place beginning at 7:00 pm at Al’s Bar.

“This is important,” Mayer said at a Sunday morning press conference. “The Scape design for the area calls for removal of the MLK viaduct. Our plans, meanwhile, attempt to work with it rather than remove it. It’s a difference worth considering. And 2-for-1 at Al’s.”

And don’t worry, Mayer says. There were plenty of great ideas.

“I was skeptical at first, but color me impressed. There’s just a lot of bright FUCers out there.”

Sep 122013
 

Courier News

Sunday afternoon at the BCTC bike-check. Photo by Danny Mayer.

Sunday afternoon at the BCTC bike-check. Photo by Danny Mayer.

To encourage healthy and environmental modes of travel, for the fourth consecutive year the BCTC Sustainability Committee staffed a bike-check service at the internationally known Woodland Arts Fair, which was held this year on August 17 and 18. The service allows fair-goers to drop off their bikes in a secure area overseen by faculty and staff. Previous years have seen such notables as then-mayor Jim Newberry utilizing the service.

This year, the bike-check included several “snail” bike racks welded together by BCTC faculty member Shawn Gannon. And they were needed: over the course of the weekend, faculty and staff volunteers checked in over 170 bikes of all varieties–from 1940s-era three-speeds to modern bike-pulled children’s trailers. BCTC staff member Larry Porter, chief organizer for the bike-check, hopes to expand upon the service next year by providing it for downtown Lexington’s Thursday Night Live series.

Reprinted from the Bluegrass Courier, the student newspaper at BCTC.

 

Sep 112013
 

By Jerry Moody

Jerry Moody beneath the MLK stature. Photo courtesy of Moody collection.

Jerry Moody beneath the MLK stature. Photo courtesy of Moody collection.

As the bus to Washington DC pulled out of Lexington for the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Justice, my mind went to freedom riders of an earlier day. Sitting in this comfortable seat watching TV, the air conditioner cooling my brow, from time to time checking the internet for the latest news or weather reports, I thought of how much different this must have been for those first buses pulling north. Those were hot overcrowded school buses rolling down country roads from backwater Virginia or anywhere Alabama, from the Charlestons and Tupelos that lay spread throughout the Southeast. Each bump in the rode must have sent the riders bouncing into each other.

Two hours into the trip at a rest stop, I thought again how much different it must have been. No clean freshly mopped restrooms spaced evenly along a smooth ribbon of super highway. At best maybe a gas station, with explicit or understood WHITES ONLY signs resting above the restroom doors and leering white station owners affording the colorful bus-goers little privacy or dignity. Continue reading »